Make the Most of an Entry-Level Job

Lily Cedarbaum

Lily Cedarbaum

As a college student in NYC, I quickly got sucked into the world of television internships and became addicted to it right away. Starting off in Corporate Communications at NBC Universal, I eventually networked my way into internships at Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Joy Behar, The New York Television Festival, Doctor Oz, and Saturday Night Live. While I loved my internships at high-profile networks and festivals, I was excited to branch out and try something off-beat after graduation. To shake things up, I spent a few months living in Los Angeles, where I spent time freelancing and meeting with contacts before finding my way back to New York for a job at MindSmack TV.

The entertainment industry is a hard field to navigate, and I am excited to be a part of The Media Chronicles to assist others along the way!
Lily Cedarbaum

Do you have “assistant,” “coordinator,” or “personal” in your job title? While you may view your current position as a stepping-stone, it’s vital to acknowledge how important you are. In fact, without the support of entry-level staff, artistic production would run a lot less smoothly (and definitely not on time).

But I’m also guessing you wouldn’t have followed your interest in media if you didn’t have a creative spark all your own. Otherwise, you’d be in an industry that promised more financial stability. What most entry-level opportunities require you to do, though, is facilitate the creativity of others rather than utilize your own.

What becomes important then is to find creative outlets at work that allow you to continue flexing your creative muscle while also becoming a more valuable member of your company. Below are a few ideas on how to enterprise on the creative potential of your workplace:

Write
Take advantage of the social media craze and offer to assist with your company’s Twitter and Facebook accounts. You can develop a voice for your company while actually writing as part of your job. You could also suggest writing press releases, articles, and interviews for your company’s website. Unless your company is already big enough to have its own corporate communications department, chances are the extra help will be beneficial.

Pitch Ideas
Any CEO worth his or her salt is always looking for new directions for the company to develop or expand. It obviously depends on your relationship with your superiors, but try to feel out what your boss is looking for. If you work for a company that wants to branch out into production, write down a few quick, realistic pitches. Find a supervisor you can send your script, music, or short story to for some constructive criticism. The best way to gain creative exposure is to put yourself out there in front of people who have experience in the business.

Take Classes
Part of being creative is always learning more about your craft. There are tons of cheap classes you can take after work or on weekends to network with others and develop your craft. You can take improv or writing classes, acting classes, painting classes, etc. If you’re interested in learning a craft that would benefit your company, ask HR if they sponsor training programs. Maybe you’d like to learn some basic website design so you can improve the company website? Perhaps you want to mature your skills in coding or Photoshop? These skills can be incredibly useful to your current company, while also engaging your own interest.

Form a Club
Are there any coworkers that share similar interests? Start an informal club! This teamwork allows for you to encourage each other to constantly produce new work. Even starting a book club or a knitting club can help you feel creatively stimulated while also allowing you get to know your officemates better.

Maybe it’s The¬†Office¬†super-fan in me, but I always think about Pam painting a mural for the warehouse, designing a logo for Dunder Mifflin Infinity, and going off to school in NYC. As a receptionist, she used her artistic eye to enrich a company that desperately needed it, albeit one (slightly) outside of media. No matter what your job is, there are always methods of inserting your own brand of creativity into each project. In doing so, you will feel more invaluable at work while also finding new appreciation for your role.

Lily Cedarbaum

As a college student in NYC, I quickly got sucked into the world of television internships and became addicted to it right away. Starting off in Corporate Communications at NBC Universal, I eventually networked my way into internships at Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Joy Behar, The New York Television Festival, Doctor Oz, and Saturday Night Live. While I loved my internships at high-profile networks and festivals, I was excited to branch out and try something off-beat after graduation. To shake things up, I spent a few months living in Los Angeles, where I spent time freelancing and meeting with contacts before finding my way back to New York for a job at MindSmack TV. The entertainment industry is a hard field to navigate, and I am excited to be a part of The Media Chronicles to assist others along the way!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Unable to load the Are You a Human PlayThru™. Please contact the site owner to report the problem.