The Art of Juggling: Balancing Multiple Jobs

Lily Cedarbaum

Lily Cedarbaum

As a college student in NYC, I quickly got sucked into the world of television internships and became addicted to it right away. Starting off in Corporate Communications at NBC Universal, I eventually networked my way into internships at Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Joy Behar, The New York Television Festival, Doctor Oz, and Saturday Night Live. While I loved my internships at high-profile networks and festivals, I was excited to branch out and try something off-beat after graduation. To shake things up, I spent a few months living in Los Angeles, where I spent time freelancing and meeting with contacts before finding my way back to New York for a job at MindSmack TV.

The entertainment industry is a hard field to navigate, and I am excited to be a part of The Media Chronicles to assist others along the way!
Lily Cedarbaum

There’s nothing glamorous to balancing multiple jobs—that is unless of course you are undercover in the CIA. Yet, more entry-level employees in entertainment than aught to are depend on at least two regular paychecks to survive. They’re called freelancers, part-timers, but more than anything they are usually the overworked and under-insured. If you find yourself in the position of piecing together a few opportunities to equal a full salary, take these hints on how best to manage this lifestyle:

Have a Primary Job
It is easier to split your schedule if you are utilizing funds from one position to support you while you artistically thrive at the other. If your heart isn’t in either of your jobs, then you end up stretching out your schedule without finding the enjoyment to get you through it. Take a cue from the classic waiter-actor dynamic, and find a balance between money and creativity through your multi-occupational schedule. This will also allow an easier transition toward a mono-occupational lifestyle, as your favored path is obvious.

Make Sure There’s a Next Step
At your preferred position, make sure there is room for growth. Yes, part-time is a reality, but it shouldn’t be permanent. Between the schedule re-arranging, uniform changes, strange hours, and the multitude of policies, this lifestyle can only exist so long. Be sure to pay attention to job posts within the office, as well as online regarding your company and their competitors. Also, be sure to make supervisors aware of your interest in full-time positions; they know part-time isn’t ideal. Don’t be afraid to ask for references either; if your companies cannot afford to offer you full-time positions, the least they can do is help you find a company who can.

Invest in a Whiteboard Calendar
With no regularity to your schedule, it’s important to keep track of it in a fluid method of organization, and sometimes Google Calendar just isn’t enough! Investing in a whiteboard calendar to place on the wall or refrigerator allows you to quickly rearrange your shifts or address taking on extra shifts if a coworker asks for help. This way your roommates or significant other will also always have access to your schedule in case they want to set up a night out (or a night in…). Color-coding is also recommended so you can see the difference between jobs and see how your hours balance between your multiple positions.

Find People to Cover Your Shifts
The follow-up to schedule organization is developing positive relationships with coworkers who can cover for you in emergencies. Obviously they are new friends first, but they are also people you want to have on your good side no matter what. Without people who are willing to do you a favor, you may end up working on your birthday or you may miss that concert or play you’ve been dying to see for months. Treat your coworkers with respect.

Lily Cedarbaum

As a college student in NYC, I quickly got sucked into the world of television internships and became addicted to it right away. Starting off in Corporate Communications at NBC Universal, I eventually networked my way into internships at Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Joy Behar, The New York Television Festival, Doctor Oz, and Saturday Night Live. While I loved my internships at high-profile networks and festivals, I was excited to branch out and try something off-beat after graduation. To shake things up, I spent a few months living in Los Angeles, where I spent time freelancing and meeting with contacts before finding my way back to New York for a job at MindSmack TV. The entertainment industry is a hard field to navigate, and I am excited to be a part of The Media Chronicles to assist others along the way!

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