The Waiting Game: What “Boyhood” Teaches About Patience at Work

Lily Cedarbaum

Lily Cedarbaum

As a college student in NYC, I quickly got sucked into the world of television internships and became addicted to it right away. Starting off in Corporate Communications at NBC Universal, I eventually networked my way into internships at Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Joy Behar, The New York Television Festival, Doctor Oz, and Saturday Night Live. While I loved my internships at high-profile networks and festivals, I was excited to branch out and try something off-beat after graduation. To shake things up, I spent a few months living in Los Angeles, where I spent time freelancing and meeting with contacts before finding my way back to New York for a job at MindSmack TV.

The entertainment industry is a hard field to navigate, and I am excited to be a part of The Media Chronicles to assist others along the way!
Lily Cedarbaum

I’m going to see Boyhood in three hours and 25 minutes and I literally cannot wait. My friend, who is doing PR for the film, has been hyping it for months and, on top of that, a Linklater film is usually a film experience you keep mentally masticating long after your eyes take it in.

However, the irony does not escape me of how long we’ve really been waiting—how much patience Linklater must have needed to allow his artwork to bud and flourish before it was ready to be released. Over 10 years! In a world that seems to be spinning at exponentially increasing speed, where if you don’t do something now someone else will snatch your idea up, the notion of artistic patience becomes refreshing once more. If your voice is truly unique, shouldn’t you be able to take the time to cultivate it in its best form?

The office place cliché for production companies is that everything is always moving a mile a minute, but really, patience plays a role more often than not. Earlier this year, founder of Get Hired, LLC, Beth Kuhel wrote a poignant article discussing the value of strengthening and implementing your own patience in the workplace. There are negotiations and hundreds of tweaks made on projects before they are approved, and sometimes there is a waiting game where there is nothing to do but put out positive energy. Among other benefits, she argues, patience allows for perseverance, adjustment, and contemplation, and additionally, a wiser mindset about your career path and where it is headed. Working too fast on too many projects can lead to mistakes and shoddy work. Kuhel believes patience is indeed still a virtue!

Similarly, if you don’t take the time to appreciate and grow the connections you make along the way, your network won’t be as strong as you need it to be later on in your career. Many entrepreneurs still very much value their early-life work experiences and guides along the way. Yes, be assertive and think about the future. But the key is to also be aware of the present, and learn along the way.

Patience can often be confused with apprehension. The key is to not be afraid. As long as you are working from a place of patience and not a place of insecurity, you should be able to take the time necessary to develop your career and create art with pride. And the rest of the world can slow down to enjoy the view!

Lily Cedarbaum

As a college student in NYC, I quickly got sucked into the world of television internships and became addicted to it right away. Starting off in Corporate Communications at NBC Universal, I eventually networked my way into internships at Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Joy Behar, The New York Television Festival, Doctor Oz, and Saturday Night Live. While I loved my internships at high-profile networks and festivals, I was excited to branch out and try something off-beat after graduation. To shake things up, I spent a few months living in Los Angeles, where I spent time freelancing and meeting with contacts before finding my way back to New York for a job at MindSmack TV. The entertainment industry is a hard field to navigate, and I am excited to be a part of The Media Chronicles to assist others along the way!

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